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Mega Disasters: Windy City Tornado DVD

Mega Disasters: Windy City Tornado DVD

SKU ID #69711

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Houdini BR
  • Additional Details
  • Format: Color, DVD-Video, NTSC
  • Rating: Not Rated
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Run Time: 50 Minutes
  • Region: Region 1 Region?
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Language: English
  • Studio: History Channel
  • DVD Release Date: July 11, 2006

Extraordinary computer graphics and footage from earlier storms show what would happen if a twister struck the "Windy City."

  • Examine the after-effects of a devastating 1967 storm that missed Chicago by a mere 10 miles.
  • MEGA DISASTERS explores the worst of what could happen.
  • Stunning computer graphics and actual footage combine to create convincing pictures of the risks faced by U.S. cities.


It has happened before, and it could happen again. What makes storms, earthquakes and other events into natural disaster is not how they occur, but where they strike.

MEGA DISASTERS asks the what ifs? no one ever wants to face. A masterful blend of actual footage, computer graphics and interviews with leading scientists and public safety experts explores the outer limits of what could happen if everything went wrong.

Though Chicago is famed as the "Windy City", many believe a tornado can't strike its downtown. It's a dangerous misconception. In 1967, a high-speed tornado screamed along a 16-mile path from the south Chicago suburb of Oak Lawn all the way to Lake Michigan. Had the path been just 10 miles to the north, the twister would have punched its way right into the Loop. The city's emergency officials say it bluntly: "Chicago is at high risk for tornadoes."

In 1967, 33 people died. In the future, how many more will be at risk? Will the city's skyscrapers survive? MEGA DISASTERS revisits the '67 storm to see how Chicago might hold up in the face of a direct hit.

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